Wednesday, September 24, 2008

First Day of School






















I started American Sign Language 1 last night at a local community college.
It was fantastic.
FANTASTIC.
My professor is deaf, and didn't speak a word for the first hour and a half of class. Can you imagine! I got a good taste of what total immersion would be like, because by the end of the three hour class period, I was able to communicate basic introductions and family information with my classmates.
The most interesting thing I learned is that ASL is a completely different language. It is not English. I never understood that before. That will be the hardest part about the class for me, because the sentence structures are completely different than anything I'm familiar with.
It was hard to be away from the baby. I've never been away from her that long before, but I think it's good for both of us. I guess. This is something I've always wanted to do since I took a sign language class during summer school at EP Rock. I've been reading books about signing with children, and have been signing with SJ for a couple of months. I think she is starting to recognize the sign for "all done," but is not yet able to put it all together.
I was so wound up when I got home last night that at 1am, Richard put his hand over my mouth.
Point taken.

6 comments:

Carla said...

That is so awesome! Look at my big girl, all growed up and going off to college!

Kelli said...

Richard's own version of sign language.

I always wanted to do that, too. I'm so glad you're doing it.

Was the school bus on time?

kathaleend said...

I don't think you had that same smile of the first day of kindergarten. Funny that then you had seperation anxiety and you do again!

angie said...

maybe you should have been signing in bed, too? :)
and yay for you! way to go out there and try something new!

jessica said...

I think we were in the summer school class together. That is awesome Erin. Keep us updated!

Kris H said...

Erin, this is great! I have enjoyed getting to know the interpreters at our church. They have taught me some very interesting things about the deaf culture.